Defence Indigenous Development Program (DIDP)

Are you Indigenous and Interested in Joining the Armed Forces?

Come along!!

INformation session

tUESDAY 17TH JUNE 2014

The Defence Indigenous Development Program (DIDP) is for young Indigenous adults that want to join the ADF but who may be challenged by reading and writing, fitness or are just not sure if the ADF is for them.

By the end of the course you will have the skills, knowledge and attitude to apply for full-time careers in the ADF.

The DIDP is a five-month residential course that focuses on six key areas:

  1. Language, Literacy, and Numeracy training;

  2. Military skills, including weapon training;

  3. Physical fitness;

  4. Vocational Education and Training;

  5. Cultural appreciation; and

  6. Leadership and character development.

What’s more, we’ll pay you for everyday you’re on the course.

DIDP Dates:

DIDP NT 26 April – 11 September 2014 Batchelor, NT
DIDP NQ 7 August – 18 December 2014 Cairns, NQ

Contact: Christine Malone @ Minniecon & Burke on 0428 229 532 or email Christine@minbur.com.au

didp flyer 17.6.14

 

Good news story – Qld’s first Indigenous intergenerational doctors

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-07/noel-and-gemma-hayman-become-qld-first-indig-intergen-doctors/5436250

Aboriginal father, daughter become Queensland’s first Indigenous intergenerational doctors

Brisbane daughter and father, Gemma and Noel Hayman, Queensland's first Indigenous intergenerational doctors in May 2014.Photo: Gemma Hayman is now following in her doctor father Noel Hayman’s footsteps (ABC TV News)

Map: Brisbane 4000

A father and daughter from Brisbane, Noel and Gemma Hayman, have become Queensland’s first Indigenous intergenerational doctors.

Mr Hayman made history in 1990 when he was one of two Aboriginal people to graduate in medicine from the University of Queensland.

His daughter is now following in her father’s footsteps.

“I’m so honoured to have another generation of Indigenous doctors coming through,” Mr Hayman said.

Former prison guard Gemma HaymanPhoto: Former prison guard Gemma Hayman has finished postgraduate studies in medicine and is now interning at Logan Hospital. (Photo courtesy of Gemma Hayman)

“When I started, there was only about five or six Aboriginal doctors across Australia.

“Now we have about 250, and about 250 Aboriginal medical students studying.”

Ms Hayman recently finished postgraduate studies in medicine and is now interning at Logan Hospital, south of Brisbane.

However, she was not always sure a career in medicine was the right path.

My father’s been probably my role model my whole life and I’m just grateful that he brought me up right and gave me a good grounding in life.

Gemma Hayman

The 31-year-old has also worked as a prison guard and a police officer.

“I had to try the other things first so I knew what I was doing,” she said.

“I’m glad that I had that experience, but I think medicine suited me as I got a bit older.”

Mr Hayman remembers his own studies, which he began in 1985.

“Gemma was about two years old, and I used to take her to lectures when I went to medical school,” he said.

“Some of my mates still remember Gemma coming with me to lectures over at Herston.”

Dr Hayman said he encouraged his daughter to consider a career in medicine for years and was thrilled when she did.

“It’s a real big buzz for a Dad to see their daughter come through and doing well,” he said

“I’m sure she’s going to do well in the future, because she’s very committed and very passionate about working with the community.”

The medical careers of both father and daughter have stemmed from a desire to help close the gap in Indigenous health.

“I had brothers with diabetes and sisters with diabetes,” Mr Hayman said.

It’s a real big buzz for a Dad to see their daughter come through and doing well … she’s very committed and very passionate about working with the community.

Dr Noel Hayman

“Medicine just seemed fascinating to me, so I just sort of went from there.”

Dr Hayman now runs the Southern Queensland Centre of Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Primary Health Care in Inala, which has over 10,000 registered patients.

“A lot of patients come to me and they say, ‘Look, Noel, we can relate with you much better than what we do with non-Indigenous doctors’, and they say they can open up and explain more about what’s going on,” he said.

“You know there are some predictions that it will take 30 years to close the gap.

“But I can see big benefits just by targeting primary care and keeping Aboriginal people well through their life span.”

Former Qld police officer Gemma HaymanPhoto: Gemma Hayman was also a Queensland police officer. (File photo courtesy of Gemma Hayman)

Ms Hayman credits her father’s dedication to his work for inspiring her to follow suit.

“My father’s been probably my role model my whole life and I’m just grateful that he brought me up right and gave me a good grounding in life,” she said.

“I think it’s pretty amazing what he’s doing.

“He has a passion for Indigenous health and loves working in the area so it doesn’t make work a chore for him.”

Once she finishes her rotations at Logan Hospital, Ms Hayman is hoping to specialise in forensic psychiatry.

Mr Hayman hopes this may mean an opportunity to work alongside his daughter.

“Hopefully Gemma will come along and maybe do a psych registrar term with us in the community out at Inala,” he said.

Indigenous Funding Initiative

Through Great Skills. Real Opportunities. the Government is changing the way it invests in training. On 1 July 2013, the department implemented the Certificate 3 Guarantee and invited applications for the Community Learning Program.

These programs, along with User Choice and the Strategic Purchasing Program (SPP), will be the major source of publicly funded training in Queensland and will provide access to government subsidised or funded training places.

The department is committed to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander training participation and outcomes. Consequently, the Indigenous Funding Pool has been revised to provide for training initiatives that may not be able to be conducted through the above programs.

In line with the above please see attached guidelines and proposal template.

Attachment 1 – IFP Proposal Template

IFP Funding Guidelines Final

Queensland Indigenous Education Consultative Committee (QIECC)

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The Queensland Indigenous Education Consultative Committee (QIECC) is a body of prominent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experts in education and training formed in February 2006.

The Queensland Indigenous Education Consultative Committee (QIECC) is an advisory committee established under s.412 of the Education (General Provisions) Act 2006. This Act gives the Minister responsible for the State Education Portfolio (The Honorable John-Paul Langbroek MP, the Minister for Education, Training and Employment) the ability to establish such a committee. The Act states: ‘The Minister may establish advisory committees to advise the Minister on any aspects of education’.

The QIECC is independent from the Department of Education and Training (the department), although the department provides in-kind support to the committee by way human, financial and facility services.

The Commonwealth Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and Youth (the Honorable Peter Garrett, AM, MP) through the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) provides funding to the QIECC for associated operational and administrative costs. The Committee provides advice to both the State and Federal Ministers for Education.

The QIECC continues the role of independent consultative committees on Indigenous education that began in 1976, with the Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Consultative Committee (QATSICC).

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