2015 Harvey Norman Rugby League All Stars | Tickets on sale | Vote for the Indigenous All Stars now!

rugbyleagueallstars

2015 Harvey Norman Rugby League All Stars
Cbus Super Stadium, Robina
Friday, February 13

The 2015 Harvey Norman Rugby League All Stars is back at Cbus Super Stadium, home of the Gold Coast Titans! The best Indigenous players in Rugby League will clash with the NRL All Stars on Friday, February 13, 2015 and will be looking to get their season off to the best start possible.

Tickets are now on sale, starting from $35 for Adults (discounted pre-sale price)! Head to Ticketek.com.au/AllStars to secure yours now!

2015 Harvey Norman Rugby League All Stars Ticket Pricing
  Adult Junior Family
Category 1 $100 $80 $70 $280
Category 2 $70 $55 $45 $195
Category 3 $35 $30 $25 $95

allstars2

 

Stronger Families Website

Just a reminder to visit the Stronger Families website (www.qld.gov.au/strongerfamilies) and subscribe to the Stronger Families e-update. This is a regular e-newsletter that has been developed to support the program and keep stakeholders up-to-date regarding the progress of the reforms. I encourage you to subscribe to these emails and also let your network of contacts know about both the website and e-update as they will be valuable sources of information as the reforms are implemented. Cheers Danny

Stronger Families | Community support | Queensland Government

Stronger Families will deliver information and links into other agency sites about the initiatives coming out of the Queensland Government’s reform agenda for a new family support system.

Kylie Colquhoun|  Principal Community Services Officer

Child Safety Services

Central Queensland Region |Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services

Horticulture Course – for people from CALD backgrounds

multicultural

Greening Up Horticulture skills for refugees and migrants FREE training for eligible participants

AHC20410 Certificate II in Horticulture 39280QLD Course in Core Skills for Employment and Training

20 January – 2 April 2015 (11 weeks full-time) Rockhampton location

Sign up if you are…

• from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds

• aged 15 years and over

• currently un- or underemployed

Visit www.mdaltd.org.au to complete an Expression of Interest form.

Please note people with a Certificate III or higher qualification (or currently enrolled in such a course), on income support or accessing Australian Government employment services or assistance are ineligible for this course.  This training is proudly funded and supported by the Queensland Government through its Community Learning Program

Jane Chapman – Services Coordinator – Rockhampton MDA Ltd

Phone: (07) 4921 2222 | Mobile: 0409 784 212 – 46A Denham Street, Rockhampton Qld 4700, P.O. Box 619, Rockhampton Qld 4700

CLI _Rockhampton_Intake 1

Christmas Greetings – from FBEC

MERRY CHRISTMAS & A HAPPY NEW YEAR
As we all go off to enjoy a much deserved seasonal break with
family & friends, we would like to say thank you for
your support & the enjoyment of working with you in 2014.
Have a very safe & happy holidays & see you all again in 2015.

From all of us here at FBEC and Reconnect

Office Closures Dates
Closes: Friday 19 December 2014
Re-open: 5 January 2015

Christmas Greetings

Dear  Communities and Service Providers

Another wonderful year that soon will be passing by…and 2015, the New Year’s full of opportunities and possibilities… just around the corner.

I would like to acknowledge your on-going support, assistance, participation and friendship in 2014.  Your valuable effort in Rockhampton Regional LAMP Program is very much appreciated, thank you. Looking forward to working with you all in 2015.

“May you enjoy this Christmas and keep alive the “Reason for the Season” – and begin the New Year in a safe and peaceful fashion.  May God’s Blessings be showered on each and everyone of you at this time of the year and forever more!”

Once again, thank you, keep safe and stay happy.

Maria Rickertt
Multicultural Community Relations Officer I Communities and Facilities
Rockhampton Regional Council I School of Arts Rockhampton

Ph: 07 4936 8569 I Mobile: 0447 221 184

Fax: 1300 22 55 79 I E-mail: maria.rickertt@rrc.qld.gov.au
Address:PO Box 1860, Rockhampton Q 4700 I Web:www.rockhamptonregion.qld.gov.au

Like us www.facebook.com/RockhamptonRegionalCouncil Follow us www.twitter.com/RRCouncil

POWER PRICES: ACOSS SURVEY: INEQUALITY: YOUTH SURVEY: NEW REGULATOR: DISABILITY: MENTAL HEALTH: SERVICE INFO; RESOURCES: REPORT; RESOURCES: GRANTS: EVENTS

Regional Queensland power prices stabilise but some will still struggle

The Queensland Competition Authority (QCA) has recently announced draft electricity prices for regional Queenslanders that are less than expected but will still hit some customers hard. While the average increase from 1 July 2015 will be around $40 per year the fixed charge has increased 29 per cent which means for some regional households bills will go up even before they have turned on a light. “It is households who use very little electricity that will feel the increase the most,” said Queensland Council of Social Service CEO Mark Henley.  “Low income households who are just scraping by to pay their bills and trying to save electricity, are potentially being hit hardest by this change in the pricing structure.” “We are relieved that prices will not increase at the unsustainable rate we have seen during the past six years – however an average increase of 2.7 per cent is still an increase that many regional households simply can’t afford.”

“We know regional households face higher overall costs of living and are more likely to experience poverty and disadvantage.  Last year 12,454 regional households disconnected from electricity for not paying a bill last year, which is an increase of 87 per cent on the previous year.” Customers experiencing difficulty paying their bills should contact Ergon Energy as soon as possible about their hardship programs and payment plans that may be available to them. “There are things people can do it they are struggling to pay their bills – the first step is to call their retailer and ask what assistance is available.” During the next two years QCOSS will be working to support households with information to help them manage their electricity costs. For more information visit Communitydoor.org.au/essential-services

Results of 2014 ACCOS Survey. Australian Policy Online. December 8th

The Australian Community Sector Survey (ACSS) was conducted at a time when changes to social policy were expected to significantly impact the lives of  people experiencing poverty in Australia. The release of the Federal Budget 2014-15 included a range of proposed changes to social security payments and social welfare and health services and supports. Prior to the Budget, the Government initiated a National Commission of Audit to recommend ways to  improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government expenditure in the face of ongoing fiscal challenges; and had instigated a review of the welfare system. This year the ACSS has been redesigned to focus on the perspectives of sector staff about the experience of the people who use their services. Sector staff involved in the day to day delivery of services have a unique and valuable contribution to make to the community’s knowledge and understanding of people’s experience of poverty and what services and policy measures are needed to alleviate it. This survey captures the perspectives of almost 1,000 sector   participation of 2 million volunteers. The ACSS is the only annual, national survey of the community sector, by the community sector. For over 15 years, it has functioned as a gauge of how the sector and the people it serves are faring. This year the ACSS has been redesigned to focus on the perspectives of sector staff about the experience of the people who use their services. Sector staff involved in the day to day delivery of services have a unique and valuable contribution to make to the community’s knowledge and understanding of people’s experience of poverty and what services and policy measures are needed to alleviate it. This survey captures the perspectives of almost 1,000 sector staff to show what life is like for people most at risk of poverty and disadvantage in our communities. In the wake of recent proposed and enacted changes to a range of social policies in Australia, and in line with ACOSS’ strategic focus on income support and employment policy and housing and homelessness, three groups of service users were chosen as the focus of the survey: young unemployed people, sole parents and older unemployed people. Their particular experiences are drawn out in this report. ACOSS recognises that these groups are only a few of the many sections of the community that have been and will be affected by proposed social policy changes. To see this original article or to access the full report, please click on Australian Policy Online

Income Inequality to Worsen Under Budget -Senate Report Pro Bono 4th December.

An all-party Senate Committee Report table in the final days of Federal Parliament has warned that inequality and poverty will worsen in Australia under the Abbott Government’s current Budget plans. The strongly worded report by the Senate’s Community Affairs References Committee, Bridging our growing divide: inequality in Australia, says the harsh approach of the Federal Budget will push more people into poverty and disadvantage and calls for many of its more punitive measures to be abandoned.

The Senate Committee that delivered the 273 page Report was chaired by West Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert with the Deputy chair, Queensland Liberal Senator Sue Boyce.

According to the report, current Government policy and in particular the 2014–15 Budget will disproportionately and negatively impact people living on low incomes.

“Much of the evidence showed that the likely impact of the Budget measures will be to exacerbate income inequality and poverty in Australia,” the report said.

“It is critical that the harsh measures to cut and withhold benefits proposed in the 2014 Federal Budget not be passed. It is also crucial than reform of Australia’s social security payment system not only leaves no group financially worse off, but increases the financial position of those facing greatest hardship,” VCOSS CEO Emma King said.

“This report is further evidence that the Federal Government has taken the wrong approach in seeking to make budget savings at the expense of supporting our most vulnerable people.

“The Senate Committee recommends the Government should not proceed with many of the harsher budget measures, including the proposed cuts to indexation of pensions and welfare payments, the removal of income support for jobseekers under 30, the introduction of a GP co-payment, and many of the so-called “Earn-or-Learn” provisions for young unemployed people. To read the full report, please click on Pro Bono

Highlights of Mission Australia Youth Survey 2014

This year, 13,600 young Australians aged 15-19 took part in Mission Australia’s 13th annual #youthsurvey. It explored what young people value, their issues of concern, where they turn for help, their engagement in community activities and feelings about the future and included a particular focus on young people’s aspirations and revealed that:

  • over 8 in 10 young people felt that achieving career success and being financially independent were highly important, only around 6 in 10 of young people who highly valued these aspirations felt that they would be achievable
  • the issue of greatest personal concern for young people in 2014 was coping with stress, with more than one in three respondents expressing high levels of concern, highlighting the immense pressure young Australians are facing in their final years of school.
  • Around 80% of young people ranked education and hard work as the top two factors they believe will influence their career opportunities in the future
  • Almost 50% of young people believe where they live will affect the career opportunities available
  • More than 70% of young people ranked owning their own home as a key aspiration, and most felt this was also achievable despite falling rates of home ownership in Australia
  • Coping with stress is the number one personal concern for young people, alongside school or study problems. Young women in particular are increasingly overwhelmed with more than half saying they are either extremely or very concerned about coping with stress

To read the full results, please click on  the Mission Australia’s Youth Survey 2014 or our helpful Infographic .

New ‘Regulator’ for Face to Face Fundraising: Xavier Smerdon. Pro Bono. December 11th

Six powerful Australian charities have united to protect the future of face to face fundraising, or “chugging”, as it is controversially known. Amnesty International Australia, Australian Red Cross, Cancer Council NSW, Greenpeace Australia Pacific, MSF Australia and The Fred Hollows Foundation have combined to fund the development of the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA). The organisation will act as a regulator of face to face fundraising with the goal of introducing and maintaining an industry standard for the often maligned form of fundraising. Paul Tavatgis, who has been working with the stakeholder charities to help develop the PFRA, told Pro Bono Australia News that the organisation would be the “day to day policemen” of chugging. He said it had been set up to ensure face to face fundraising could survive amid growing threats to its sustainability. “It’s been around since the late 1990’s and I think every year now it’s pulling in at least $200 million for charities in Australia,” Tavatgis said. “So it’s a fairly substantial source of funds and probably recruiting in excess of 300,000 new donors every year for Australian charities. To read the complete article please click on Pro Bono

Disability

The ‘Stressful’ State of the Disability Sector – Report.Lina Caneva. Pro Bono. December 9th

Australia’s disability sector is dysfunctional, and transforming it is complicated, arduous and stressful with the National Disability Insurance Scheme currently “immersed in problem-solving”, according to a new sector report. Called the State of the Disability Sector, the report was launched by National Disability Services, the peak industry body for non-Government disability services at a national CEO conference in Melbourne which hosted 550 sector leaders.“The resilience of disability service providers is being tested. Ambitious reforms, a tight fiscal environment, rigid program rules and uncertainty about wage setting in supported employment make for a complex operating environment,” NDS Chief Executive, Dr Ken Baker, told the Conference. The State of the Disability Sector report includes a business confidence index for the disability sector, the first in-depth measurement of how disability service providers are faring during this period of major reform, an analysis of the challenges of implementing the NDIS around Australia, and a broad review of disability policy and trends. To read the full article please click on Pro Bono

NDIS On Target to Savings – Annual Report. Pro Bono. November 20th

The first annual report of the National Disability Insurance Agency that administers the NDIS says that the economic benefits of the Scheme will outweigh its costs in the long term, saving $20 billion per year by 2035. The Annual Report, tabled in Federal Parliament, shows that at full rollout, it is expected that only seven per cent of NDIS costs will be spent on administration, with 85 per cent of NDIA staff roles dealing directly with people with disability. “The long-term economic benefits of the NDIS are estimated to exceed its costs, adding around 1 per cent to gross domestic product and saving $20 billion per year by 2035,” the report said. The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) commenced on 1 July 2013. The NDIA is chaired by Bruce Bonyhady AM and the CEO is David Bowen. The report said that at 30 June 2014, the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) had approved 7316 plans for people with disability, “allowing them access to the reasonable and necessary support they require to lead an ordinary life”.

“Headline results from 2013–14 show that the NDIA’s progress is extremely positive. Costs are under control, the Agency is driving efficiencies and participant satisfaction is extremely high,” the report said. “The NDIA delivered the Scheme in four trial sites in 2013–14: the Hunter in New South Wales, the Barwon region in Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia. During this time, $130.9 million of support was provided to participants — which is within the funding envelope of $148.8 million. “Average annualised package costs were $34,600 at the end of June 2014, in line with the $35,000 average estimated by the Productivity Commission. The NDIA ended the financial year with a surplus of $18.0 million. To read the complete article please click on Pro Bono

We need to talk about disability. A work in progress. Josh Adonis. The Age: November 21st

The rate of unemployment for people with a disability is 7.1 per cent. You might think that’s not too bad, except that the unemployment rate doesn’t really tell you much. The more telling statistic is that their workforce participation rate is almost three times worse than the rest of the population. Some people with disability opt out of the workforce because they have no choice; their disability is so severe it renders them unable to work. Many more, however, want to be employed but feel they can’t apply for jobs because of the stigma permeating many workplaces. This was front of mind last week at a disability employment conference I attended. An audience member asked a bureaucrat a question. The problem, he said, wasn’t that there weren’t enough candidates desiring employment. The problem was that many employers still view workers with disability as being inferior to everyone else. How can that be overcome? The bureaucrat’s solution was novel. He suggested recruiters should put candidates forward for vacancies without describing them upfront as having a disability. That way, the employer’s first impression isn’t focused on what the candidates can’t do but on what they can. To read the complete article please click on The Age

Caring for ex-prisoners under the NDIS would save money and lives. Kate van Dooren. The Conversation. November 3rd

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) promises to deliver better support to the one in five Australians living with a disability. But what about those inside prison or who have just left prison? Will the NDIS look after them too, or keep pushing them through the cracks? In our paper, published online at the Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, we examined the social circumstances and substance use of 115 prisoners with intellectual disabilities who were about to be released from Queensland prisons. The national roll-out of the NDIS could not only substantially improve the lives of former prisoners, but drastically reduce government expenditure. Nationally, governments spend more than A$200 per prisoner per day. This equates to around $600,000 spent on the estimated 3000 Australian prisoners with intellectual disability. Locking up every prisoner costs around $219,000 a year. Comparatively, as of March 2014, it was estimated that the average annual package of support through the NDIS was $34,000 per person – just a fraction of the cost to the taxpayer. The Council of Australian Governments – covering federal, state and local governments – has decided that the NDIS will not fund individuals during their time in jail, but will fund disability-specific needs once they return to the community. Yet it remains unclear how, once in the community, former prisoners with disabilities are expected to access funding, support or even the most basic information about the NDIS. To read the complete article please click on The Conversation

National Disability Insurance Agency quarterly reports

The National Disability Insurance Agency quarterly report Quarter 1 (2014-15) is now available on http://www.ndis.gov.au/document/754

Royal Commission into Institutional Reponses to Child Sexual Abuse.

AUSLAN videos have been launched on Royal Commission website: http://www.childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au/resource-centre/people-with-disability

Mental Health

Emergency departments failing patients who have attempted suicide, says study. The Guardian  December 11th

Patients who have attempted suicide are too often treated with hostility by hospital emergency department staff, senior Australian psychiatrists have said, meaning opportunities to prevent future harm are being missed. A study from the mental health charity Sane Australia and the University of New England released on Thursday found people who have attempted suicide reported being discharged too early or having difficulty being admitted to hospitals. Researchers interviewed 31 people from around Australia who had made an attempt on their life, with 80% describing their experience in hospital as negative and nearly one-third feeling they were not taken seriously. “People often try to get help, usually after considerable trauma which is difficult to talk about,” Sane’s suicide prevention manager, Sarah Coker, said. “It can be really distressing if, when they finally reach out, they are misunderstood or discharged quickly.” To read the complete article please click on The Guardian

Coronial inquest into teenagers’ deaths after mental health facility closure. Kathy McLeish. ABC 7.30.  December 5th

There will be a coronial inquest into the deaths of three teenagers after Queensland’s only long-term residential mental health facility for adolescents was closed.

The Deputy Coroner’s announcement on Friday was the news Justine Wilkinson, mother of Catilin Wilkinson-Whiticker, and the parents of teenagers Will Fowell and Talieha Nebauer were fighting for. They have long argued the Barrett Centre was closed without an appropriate transition process and a recent report confirmed it was a rushed process.

Health Minister Lawrence Springborg gave five months’ notice that the centre would close in January, with families told equivalent services would be provided closer to home.

Ms Wilkinson-Whiticker left the centre, at Wacol west of Brisbane, and stayed temporarily at a number of help centres but she died in early August. She started thinking of suicide when she was 13 and tried a few times, as had all the kids at the Barrett Centre, her mother Ms Wilkinson said. “That’s why they were at Barrett – because the community options were not sufficient to keep them alive,” she said. To read the complete article please click on ABC 7.30

Australia’s suicide rate drops but males four times more likely to suicide than females. ABC. Dec 3rd

Australia’s suicide rate has dropped, but males are still four times more likely than females to kill themselves, according to a new report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). There were 2,282 suicides in 2010-11 compared to the peak of more than 2,600 deaths in 1997-98. However, the rates of suicide per 100,000 population remained relatively static according to AIHW spokesperson Professor James Harrison. “Suicide death rates for males, adjusted for age, have fluctuated at around 20 deaths per 100,000 people between 1921 and 2010,” Professor Harrison said. During most of the same period, the suicide rate among females was about five deaths per 100,000 people per year. By 2010, the rates per 100,000 fell below 20 for males and below five for females. Suicide rates among Indigenous people were twice as high as for non-Indigenous Australians. The report also looked at generational differences in suicide. “For females, we haven’t seen any marked variation among different generations,” Professor Harrison said. “Suicide rates at about 20 years of age were higher for men born from the mid-1940s to the mid-1970s than for men born earlier or later in the 20th century,” he said. Females had a much higher rate of hospitalisation as a result of self-harm, particularly in teenage age groups since 1999. Girls aged 15 to 19 had the highest rate of hospitalised self-harm with 430 admitted to hospital per 100,000, while the rate for males the same age was 144 per 100,000. Rates of self-harm among Indigenous Australians were two-and-a-half times higher for males and twice as high for females. To see the original article please click on ABC

Service Information

Change at the top, at Home Support

In recent weeks Home Support Association has farewelled long serving Executive Office Jan Crowley and welcomed Grant Searles, to the helm. CCDA wishes Jan, Grant and HSA well with their respective futures.

The Welfare Rights Centre has had a makeover!

From 3rd December 2014 they are now known as Basic Rights Queensland Inc. You can check out the new look at www.brq.org.au . They are still be providing free, specialist advice, advocacy and legal services on:

  • Social Security (Centrelink and Employment Services) – state-widefor advice, cases referred to Townsville CLS
  • Disability Discrimination – south of Mackay

The phone numbers are stay the same: Advice line:    1800 358 511 or 3847 5532      Admin line:     3421 2510

The postal address is also still the same: PO Box 293   Fortitude Valley  Qld  4006

Updated Holiday Closures

Youth Connections closures.  

Gladstone Office will close on the 22nd of Dec and will not reopen after 31st Dec . For support during this period please call the Rockhampton Office on 49285 243

Emerald Office will close on the 22nd Dec and will not reopen after 31st Dec. For support during this period please call the Rockhampton Office on 49285 243

Rockhampton Office will be closed on the 24th , 25th Dec and will reopen on the 29th Dec and close for the final time on the 31st Dec 2014.

Lotus Place

Lotus Place will close down at Xmas on Tuesday December 16 and reopen on a limited basis on Tuesday January 5 and fully reopen again on Monday January 19. The Centre will be staffed on Tuesdays during this time

Roseberry Community Services

Office closed from 24th December to 5th January.

Roseberry House and Jacks House will be open over the Christmas period.

Legal Aid Queensland

LAQ: closed from 2.00 p.m. 24 December 2014 until 9.00 am, 2nd January 2015.

Family Relationship Centre

The FRC: open except for Public Holidays December 25, 26 & January 1st.

Anglicare Central Queensland

Closing Tuesday 23rd December returning Monday the 5th of January 2015.

Grant & Simpson Lawyers

Closing Tuesday 23rd December – re-opening 8:30am Monday 5th January 2015.

The Rockhampton Alcohol and Other Drug Service

Closed from 25th Dec to the 1st Jan inclusive. 24/7 Telephone Helpline 1800 177 833

CQ Community Legal Centre.

The CQ Community Legal Centre will be closed from December 23rd to 5th January.

Juwarki

The Diversionary Centre and Cell Watch Services will be open 24/7 as usual, information about these services is available on the Juwarki weblog: www.juwarki.org.au   :    Diversionary Centre  : Cell Watch

Partners in Recovery and CQ Medicare Local

Closed from COB 24 December 2014 returning Monday 5 January 2015.

Day to Day Living (D2D)

Closed for Public Holidays. D2D will cease its regular program of activities for four weeks from mid December to mid January and have a more relaxed time with increased outings etc.

Suncare

Operating hours will not change throughout the Christmas Break, we are open from 8.30am – 4.30pm.  The only days that the physical office will be closed are the Public Holidays.  We will still be operating our after hours for emergency respite services. The only program that will not run over the Christmas Break is the Life Skills program which is funded by Disability Services.

Uniting Care Community

Musgrave Street office closing on Christmas eve and reopening on Monday 5.01.15.

Available services to the community throughout this period will be;

  • Lifeline 24/7 Telephone Crisis Support Service – 131114
  • Financial First Aid – 1800 007 007
  • Elder Abuse Helpline – 1300 651 192

Reports

Children who bully at school

School bullying is a serious problem worldwide. There is now strong evidence to indicate that children who bully at school are at significant risk for a range of antisocial, criminal and poor health outcomes later in life. Importantly, bullying is a behaviour often influenced by family environment. As such, working with families to interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse life outcomes could be viewed as a form of early intervention for preventing crime, as well as a method of promoting health. This paper focuses on children who bully at school, and specifically on the ways in which parenting and family functioning underpin a child’s bullying behaviour. New evidence for possible protective or intervening factors that may interrupt the developmental sequence of antisocial behaviour is summarised. Parental involvement in anti-bullying interventions is also considered. Finally, some promising approaches for working with children who bully are outlined. To read the full report please click onChildren who bully at school

General Resources

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD): Resources for professionals supporting children and families

These resources are intended to inform and guide practitioners and other professionals supporting children and families affected by FASD:
Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Current issues in awareness, prevention and intervention- a paper that describes the implications of FASD, and highlights current research on prevention and intervention initiatives.
Supporting children living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Practice principles- a practice guide outlining principles for supporting children and families affected by FASD.

Supervision in the spotlight

Short articles designed to stimulate further thought and discussion on the topic of supervision in services for adolescents:

QCOSS Conference Videos

If you were unable to attend the QCOPSS Conference and are wondering what you missed; or you did go, but wish to revisit great presentations, videos from the conference are now available on the Community Door, Studio Q website. To access these presentations, please click on http://www.studioq.org.au/

Grants

Ergon Energy Community Fundcloses on December 16th
Ian Potter Foundationcloses on January 12th

Other funding options

Australian Government Grants

Queensland Government Grants

Queensland Gambling Community Benefit Fund

Department of Social Service Grants

Events, Training and Regular Meeting Date Claimers

Please note that regular meetings are suspended over the Christmas break. Training and support programs already listed for 2015 listed below.

Parenting Plan Workshop: Presenter – Joanne Madden of  Joanne Madden Solicitors. Family Relationship Centre, (corner of Fitzroy St & East St). FREE. January 20th  2015. Registration from 9.30am. Start 10am – finish 11.30am. Morning tea provided. To register please emailsandypaton@bigpond.com FULLY BOOKED

POPPERS 6 week program for children 6 – 9 years whose parents are  separated.  10thFebruary2015 3:30pm(Afternoonteaprovided)Relationships Australia,119HighStreet, Rockhampton. Cost. $50(6sessions)1stchild: $1O (foreachextrachildattendingatsametime). POPPERSaimstosupportyoungpeopleintheirexperienceof parentalseparation,conflictandchangeintheirfamilysituation. For more information or to book a place please phone 1300364277

CENTRAL HIGHLANDS Whole of Sector Day. 16th February. Venue and times tba.  The purpose of the day is to look at: Where we are as acommunity;

Evidencehowservicesareworkingtogether; Howwecansupporteachother; Communityandstaffdevelopment; Developingastrategicplanforcommunity; Findingawayforwardthroughuncertainty. Pleaseemailkarmstrong@anglicarecq.org.auforadditionalinformationortoregisteryourinteresttoparticipate.

BILOELA: Expressions Of Interest arecalled for ASIST training. Biloela Wednesday11th&Thursday12thFebruary. TheBlackDogBallCommitteeinpartnershipwithCentralQueenslandHospitalandHealthServiceareofferingASISTtrainingtomembers ofthecommunitywhoarelikelytocomeintocontactwithrural familiesundergoingextremehardshipduetocircumstancesbeyond theircontrol. Training is being offered FREE OF CHARGEas a result offunds raisedbythe2014BlackDogBalltocommunitymemberswhomay notgenerallyhaveaccesstothisessentialservice. (Workshops generally cost in the vicinity of $250 to $300 perperson). For more information and registration forms please contact: DebbieHughes, BlackDogBallCommittee, 07 49222519or 0408 156699

EMERALD: Out of Home Care Training Modules Available in Emerald –2015. Child and Youth Mental HealthService, Community Health Building at the Hospital. 

 Wednesday February 18th 11am –2pm; -Thursday February 19th 9am – 12pm. Cost: Free. Twelvetrainingmodulesarebeingmadeavailabletooutofhomecareservice providersincludingFosterCarers,ResidentialCareWorkers,SupportWorkers, CSO’s and other professionals working in the child protection sector in andaround Emerald in2015. All modules are 3 hours in duration and require participants to engage activelyin the learning through a range of individual, small group and large groupstructured activities. What to Bring:     A snack & Something to writewith. Contact Please contact Christian MieschPh: 49205700;email: Christian.miesch@health.qld.gov.au

YouthMentalHealthFirstAid.Thurs 19th&Fri20thFebruary, Room1CommunityHealthBuilding Cnr Cambridge&Bolsover Sts,9am 4.30pm.Cost:$100.00(cateringprovided)YouthMentalHealthFirstAidisa14hourcoursewhichteachesfirstaidskillsformental health crisis situations and the early stages of mental health problems  including depression, anxiety, psychosis, substance misuse, eating disorders, suicidal thoughtsand behaviour, non-suicidal self-injury, panic attacks, aggression etc. For a registration form, please contact Nicole Cooper on Email:Nicole_Cooper@health.qld.gov.au

POP Stars 6 week program for children 10 – 12 years whose parents are separated.  26thMarch2015 3:30pm(Afternoonteaprovided)Relationships Australia,119HighStreet, Rockhampton. Cost. $50(6sessions)1stchild: $1O (foreachextrachildattendingatsametime). POPSTARSaimstosupportyoungpeopleintheirexperienceof parentalseparation,conflictandchangeintheirfamilysituation. For more information or to book a place please phone 1300364277

LONGREACH: Expressions Of Interest arecalled for ASIST training. Longreach

Wednesday29th&Thursday30thApril TheBlackDogBallCommitteeinpartnershipwithCentralQueenslandHospitalandHealthServiceareofferingASISTtrainingtomembers ofthecommunitywhoarelikelytocomeintocontactwithrural familiesundergoingextremehardshipduetocircumstancesbeyond theircontrol. Training is being offered FREE OF CHARGEas a result offunds raisedbythe2014BlackDogBalltocommunitymemberswhomay notgenerallyhaveaccesstothisessentialservice. (Workshops generally cost in the vicinity of $250 to $300 perperson). For more information and registration forms please contact: DebbieHughes, BlackDogBallCommittee, 07 49222519or 0408 156699

YouthMentalHealthFirstAid.Thurs 18th&Fri19thJune, Room1CommunityHealthBuilding Cnr Cambridge&Bolsover Sts,9am 4.30pm.Cost:$100.00(cateringprovided)YouthMentalHealthFirstAidisa14hourcoursewhichteachesfirstaidskillsformental health crisis situations and the early stages of mental health problems  including depression, anxiety, psychosis, substance misuse, eating disorders, suicidal thoughtsand behaviour, non-suicidal self-injury, panic attacks, aggression etc. For a registration form, please contact Nicole Cooper on Email:Nicole_Cooper@health.qld.gov.au